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Employment Law Archives

New Jersey Commits to Higher Minimum Wage

Governor Phil Murphy.jpgThis past January, New Jersey joined California, New York, and Massachusetts by raising the minimum wage to $15.00. Governor Phil Murphy and legislative leaders signed a deal to increase minimum wage in the state from its current $8.85 to $15.00 to reflect the rising costs of living expenses and further address economic inequality. The increase would effect over one million New Jersey workers and give them an opportunity to join the middle class. 

New Jersey's New Equal Pay Act - This is Big!

Equal Pay.jpgIt has been 6 months since New Jersey's Diane B. Allen Equal Pay Act (the "Act") took effect. On March 27, 2018, the New Jersey legislature passed the Act, amending the New Jersey Law Against Discrimination ("LAD"). The LAD has long been New Jersey's law for promotion of equal pay and against employment discrimination. 

Doing it by the Book - Employee Handbooks in New Jersey

imgg.pngLike most decisions in running a business design, there's no "one size fits all" or "quick fix" when it comes to writing employee handbooks. While employee handbooks are not a requirement for all business, they can be an important preventative measure against legal violations and ensuing suits. What goes into an employee handbook largely depends on the type and size of business in question, but there's some common language, based on state and federal law, that should be in every one. Boiled down to their most basic components, employment handbooks should perform four functions: describe the expectations of employers, list the responsibilities of the employers, ensure legal compliance with applicable regulations, and provide employees with information detailing their rights. When the entire business "team" knows what's expected of them and what's to be provided by the company, uncertainty - and the threat of problems - goes down.

Bullying: Not Just For Kids

Many people believe that "bullying" stops with maturity from child to adult. But this is simply not the case. According to a study conducted by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, 25 percent of companies who participated reported some degree of bullying in the preceding year. Conservative estimates from the Workplace Bullying Institute state that bullying occurs in up to 25 percent of all workplaces. More liberal estimates put that number at 40 to 50 percent. Workplace bullying is hard to manage and even identify and is a problem at every level. According to the Crisis Prevention Institute (CPI), bullying can be defined as: 

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